Split, a town on Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast, is the second-largest city of Croatia and the largest city of the region of Dalmatia. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea, centred on the Roman Palace of the Emperor Diocletian.

Split is known for its beaches and the fortresslike complex at its center, Diocletian’s Palace, erected by the Roman emperor in the 4th century. Once home to thousands, its sprawling remains include more than 200 buildings. Within its white stone walls and under its courtyards and galleries are shops, bars, cafes, cathedrals, hotels and several houses.

In AD 305, the world’s most powerful man, Emperor Diocletian, was faced with the decision on where to spend the rest of his days. Of all of the known world, he chose to build his home in the heart of the region of Dalmatia, setting the first stones in place for the future city of Split.

Follow in his footsteps by exploring Diocletian’s Palace and a region home to islands, stunning natural landscapes such as Biokovo Mountain and Zlatni Rat beach on the island of Brač, and a wealth of culture that will defy your expectations.

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About

City Split The story of Split is already 17 centuries old, dating to the time the Roman Emperor Diocletian decided to build his Palace right on the peninsula near the great Roman city Salona, where he wanted to spend the last years of his life. During these 1700 years the Palace slowly turned into a city, which to this day …

Split

History & Culture

Diocletian Palace and Medieval Split The Emperor’s Palace is one of the most significant works of late-ancient architecture, not just for the preservation of original parts and the whole, but also for a series of original architectural forms announcing the new early-Christian, Byzantine and early-medieval art. The cathedral was built in the Middle Ages by using materials from an ancient …

Split

Events

Festivals Days of Diocletian Although Diocletian’s Palace is a symbol of Split’s magnificent history, with this luxurious event, the citizens of Split want to show it in an even more symbolic way the 1700 years of their city, by returning to their ancient past. Through the streets of the former palace, passers-by stroll around in togas and tunics, vintage carriages …

Split